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Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke visits Miss. town targe

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Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke visits Miss. town targeted by raids
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Margarita LeBlanc consoles Agusto Lopez Coronado in Canton.
MPB News

Immigrant families affected by the recent ICE raids in Mississippi say they are still looking for answers. MPB's Ashley Norwood reports.

Agusto Lopez Coronado has lived in the United States for 19 years. He is originally from Guatemala. He is standing about a block away from the poultry processing plant in Canton where he and his wife both worked. She and others were handcuffed and taken into custody by federal immigration officials more than a week ago. Through a translator, he says he doesn't know what will happen next.

"Where are they going to live? He can't live without his wife. How is he gona raise his children without his wife?"

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke said he wouldn't have stopped in Mississippi if it weren't for the recent raids which rounded up nearly 700 people. It is said to be the largest raid of its kind in American history. During his visit, the former Texas congressman spoke with immigrant families in private.

"Every single one of them said they do not know how they are going to meet the rent, how they're going to pay for an attorney for their husband or their wife or their child or their grandfather who is detained right now. How are they gona make ends meet... So we're going to talk to local organizers in the community to find out where we can direct resources," said O'Rourke.

Mike Hurst is the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Mississippi. Earlier this week, he told MPB News hearts were broken but so was the law.

"It's sad in any context when children or families are disrupted by parents who break the law but this is the law and our job is to enforce the law and that's what we're going to do," said Hurst.

More than 300 of the 680 workers have been released to take care of family needs. All face future legal proceedings. Ashley Norwood, MPB News.